Medical Eponymous Syndromes

Eponymns are so-called because they take their names from their chief protagonists (either doctors or patients). They are our sole route to an exotic variety of obscure fame: "if one was a drunkard and one's name was Johnny Walker one could form a society called Alcoholics Eponymous."

BROWSE THROUGH EPONYMOUS SYNDROMES

Medicine

  • A
  • Alice in Wonderland Syndrome (AIWS)
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation

  • B
  • Baker's cyst
  • Barrett's oesophagus
  • Bazin's disease
  • Behcet's disease
  • Berger's disease (IgA nephropathy)
  • Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis
  • Bornholm disease (Devil's grip)
  • Brown-Sequard syndrome
  • Budd-Chiari syndrome
  • Burger's disease (Thromboangiitis obliterans)
  • Brugada syndrome

  • C
  • Charcot-Marie-Tooth syndrome (Peroneal muscular atrophy)
  • Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease
  • Curtis-Fitz-Hugh syndrome

  • D
  • Daughter from California syndrome
  • De Quervain syndrome
  • De Quervain throiditis (Granulomatous thyroiditis)
  • Devic's syndrome (Neuromyelitis optica)
  • Dressler's syndrome
  • Dubin-Johnson syndrome
  • Dupuytren's contracture

  • E
  • Ekbom's syndrome

  • F
  • Fabry's disease
  • Fanconi anaemia
  • Felty's syndrome
  • Foster Kennedy syndrome
  • Friedreich's ataxia
  • Froin's syndrome

  • G
  • Gardner's syndrome
  • Gélineau's syndrome
  • Gerstmann's syndrome
  • Gilbert's syndrome
  • Gilles de la Tourette syndrome
  • Goodpasture's syndrome
  • Guillain-Barré polyneuritis

  • H
  • Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP)
  • Horner's syndrome
  • Huntington's chorea

  • I

  • J

  • K
  • Kaposi's sarcoma (KS)
  • Korsakoff's syndrome
  • Kluver-Bucy syndrome

  • L
  • Lambert-Eaton syndrome
  • Leriche's syndrome
  • Löffler's eosinophilic carditis
  • Löffler's syndrome (Pulmonary eosinophilia)
  • M
  • McArdle's glycogen storage disease (Type V)
  • Mallory-Weiss tear
  • Marchiafava-Bignami syndrome
  • Marchiafava-Micheli syndrome
  • Marfan's syndrome
  • Meig's syndrome
  • Ménétrier's disease
  • Meyer-Betz syndrome
  • Mikulicz's syndrome
  • Milroy's syndrome
  • Münchausen's syndrome

  • N
  • Nelson's syndrome

  • O
  • Ogilvie's syndrome
  • Ortner's cardiovocal syndrome
  • Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome (Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasis)

  • P
  • Paget's disease of breast
  • Pancoast's syndrome
  • Peutz-Jegher's syndrome
  • Peyronie's disease
  • Pott's syndrome
  • Prinzmetal (variant) angina

  • Q


  • R
  • Raynaud's syndrome
  • Refsum's syndrome
  • Rotor syndrome

  • S
  • Sjogren's syndrome
  • Steven-Johnson syndrome
  • Sturge-Weber syndrome

  • T
  • Takayasu's arteritis (Aortic arch syndrome)
  • Tietze's syndrome (idiopathic costochondritis)
  • Todd's palsy

  • U


  • V
  • Vincent's angina
  • Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome
  • Von Willebrand's disease (vWD)

  • W
  • Waterhouse-Friederichsen's syndrome
  • Weber's syndrome
  • Wegener's granulomatosis
  • Wernicke's encephalopathy
  • Whipple's disease

  • X


  • Y


  • Z
  • Zollinger-Ellison syndrome
Monochromatic doctors may try to abolish eponyms seeking to replace them with histologically driven disease titles. But classifications vary as more becomes known, so renaming of non-eponyms becomes essential. Eponyms carry on forever, because they imply nothing about causes. We like eponyms - and, where possible, the use of the term syndrome rather than disease. A syndrome is a collection of phenomena and is neutral on whether the collection is a disease. To tell someone with Gilles de La Tourette's syndrome that they have a disease is a slap in the face-when the condition is bound up by who they are ("I tic therefore I am"). Syndromes can sound dire to patients, or falsely glamorous.

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